February72014
8AM

the-feminist-fangirl:

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Prime Minister of Australia kicking ass and taking names (mostly Tony Abbott’s). [x]

I’m not Australian, but this woman makes a kickass point.

Great, but depressing, given that Tony Abbott is now the Prime Minister.

(Source: splintmail, via ilovebeingdifferent)

February62014
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Nels Oleson”
Richard Bull, best known for played the harried husband and father Nels Oleson on Little House on the Prairie, died on February 3, 2014 according to Alison Angrim, the actress who played his daughter Nellie.
A native of Zion, Illinois, Mr. Bull got his start in theater in Chicago at the Goodman Theater. He would move to Los Angeles in the 1950s to start a career in film and television that would span 55 years.
His first on-screen appearance was in the 1950s drama Medic. He would appear in small roles in such films as Fear Strikes Out, Three Came Back, and the original Thomas Crown Affair. On television, he would guest star on Gomer Pyle, Alfred Hitchock Presents, and Peyton Place. The first regular role he landed was as a doctor on Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea where he appeared in 27 episodes.
In 1974, he was cast as Nels Oleson, proprietor of Oleson’s Mercantile in Walnut Grove, on Little House on the Prairie. Nels Oleson was a sympathetic character who was constantly bullied and belittled by his wife Harriet and his two spoiled children Nellie and Willie. Mr. Bull would appear in the series entire nine-year run including three television specials.
After the show ended in 1983, Mr. Bull continued to work for the next three decades. He made appearances on Highway to Heaven, which co-starred his former LHOP castmates Michael Landon and Victor French, It’s Garry Shandling’s Show, and ER. His film roles were fewer but he appeared in the acclaimed films Sugar and Normal. 
Mr. Bull’s final on-screen appearance was in the Chicago-based series Boss in 2011 as an “elderly farmer.” Mr. Bull was living at the Motion Picture and Television Fund retirement community at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife, Bobbi Collentine, also an actor, to whom he was marred for 65 years.
Ms. Angrim wrote about Mr. Bull, “ In real life, he  was just as kind, intelligent, thoughtful and reasonable as you’d expect  Nels Oleson to be.”
Sources: HighlightHollywood.com, IMDB.com, and Wikipedia
(Image of Richard Bull as Nells Oleson form 1974 is copyright NBC/Universal and courtesy of IMDB.com)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Nels Oleson”

Richard Bull, best known for played the harried husband and father Nels Oleson on Little House on the Prairie, died on February 3, 2014 according to Alison Angrim, the actress who played his daughter Nellie.

A native of Zion, Illinois, Mr. Bull got his start in theater in Chicago at the Goodman Theater. He would move to Los Angeles in the 1950s to start a career in film and television that would span 55 years.

His first on-screen appearance was in the 1950s drama Medic. He would appear in small roles in such films as Fear Strikes OutThree Came Back, and the original Thomas Crown Affair. On television, he would guest star on Gomer PyleAlfred Hitchock Presents, and Peyton Place. The first regular role he landed was as a doctor on Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea where he appeared in 27 episodes.

In 1974, he was cast as Nels Oleson, proprietor of Oleson’s Mercantile in Walnut Grove, on Little House on the Prairie. Nels Oleson was a sympathetic character who was constantly bullied and belittled by his wife Harriet and his two spoiled children Nellie and Willie. Mr. Bull would appear in the series entire nine-year run including three television specials.

After the show ended in 1983, Mr. Bull continued to work for the next three decades. He made appearances on Highway to Heaven, which co-starred his former LHOP castmates Michael Landon and Victor French, It’s Garry Shandling’s Show, and ER. His film roles were fewer but he appeared in the acclaimed films Sugar and Normal. 

Mr. Bull’s final on-screen appearance was in the Chicago-based series Boss in 2011 as an “elderly farmer.” Mr. Bull was living at the Motion Picture and Television Fund retirement community at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife, Bobbi Collentine, also an actor, to whom he was marred for 65 years.

Ms. Angrim wrote about Mr. Bull, “ In real life, he  was just as kind, intelligent, thoughtful and reasonable as you’d expect  Nels Oleson to be.”

Sources: HighlightHollywood.com, IMDB.com, and Wikipedia

(Image of Richard Bull as Nells Oleson form 1974 is copyright NBC/Universal and courtesy of IMDB.com)

8AM
February52014
nprfreshair:

Today our guest Jennifer Senior discusses the “paradox of modern parenthood,” which is the subject of her new book All Joy and No Fun. In today’s interview she talks about how parenting has changed over time. Here she explains how the linguistic shift from “housewife” to “stay-at-home-mom” influenced the culture of parenting: 

In the 1960s if you stayed home with your kids, what were you? You were a “housewife.” You focused on your house. You didn’t focus on your kids. You focused on your house. Your house had to be clean. You had to master the differences between oven cleaners and floor waxes and stuff that made your wood nice and shiny but you put your kids in a playpen, that’s what you did.
And now if you stay home with your kids, you are a “stay-at-home-mom,” you focus on your kids. You are a professional mom and you focus on the right toys for your kids, the right educational things for your kids. So all the women who are working, when they’re not working they want to be professional moms too so they’re pouring all of this energy into their children in their off hours. And by the way, their houses are suffering. Their houses are a mess. If you look at the American Time Use Surveys, no one takes care of their house anymore. That’s a very clear downward slope.

nprfreshair:

Today our guest Jennifer Senior discusses the “paradox of modern parenthood,” which is the subject of her new book All Joy and No Fun. In today’s interview she talks about how parenting has changed over time. Here she explains how the linguistic shift from “housewife” to “stay-at-home-mom” influenced the culture of parenting: 

In the 1960s if you stayed home with your kids, what were you? You were a “housewife.” You focused on your house. You didn’t focus on your kids. You focused on your house. Your house had to be clean. You had to master the differences between oven cleaners and floor waxes and stuff that made your wood nice and shiny but you put your kids in a playpen, that’s what you did.

And now if you stay home with your kids, you are a “stay-at-home-mom,” you focus on your kids. You are a professional mom and you focus on the right toys for your kids, the right educational things for your kids. So all the women who are working, when they’re not working they want to be professional moms too so they’re pouring all of this energy into their children in their off hours. And by the way, their houses are suffering. Their houses are a mess. If you look at the American Time Use Surveys, no one takes care of their house anymore. That’s a very clear downward slope.

8AM
carsontheroad:

Biscuter 1953-1957selected by CarsOnTheRoad

carsontheroad:

Biscuter 1953-1957
selected by CarsOnTheRoad

February42014

uispeccoll:

Crucial Perimeter is our stunning new book arts acquisition from Islam Aly, one of the first graduates from the University of Iowa Center for the Book’s MFA program. 

I am hoping more people will learn that these historical bindings still exist and are still used in book art, and that the kind of content I use in my books will foster cross-cultural learning by making viewers learn about Islamic art and culture. “

Quoted from:

Aly, Islam Mahmoud Mohamed. “Using Historical Bindings in Producing Contemporary Artists’ Books.” Master’s thesis, University of Iowa, 2013.

 

8AM
February32014

sandandglass:

Samantha Bee talks to Peter Schiff, financial commentator and CEO of Euro Pacific Capital Inc. 

(via ilovebeingdifferent)

truth 

8AM
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